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2BC BLOG

Meet Caroline Moss, a Founding Sister of 2BC by Eleanor Speaker


"I . . . went from house to house, gathering the children that were in no other school. The Lord hearkened to our prayer, and we have by his blessing had within fifteen months 220 scholars in attendance. We thank the Master for so much encouragement in the good work. . . The Sunday school I do hope will claim a greater effort from the members."

So reads the diary of Caroline Moss in 1856. On that day she would have been wearing a hat, and a fashionable dress with slender shoulders, a pointed waist, and long bell-shaped skirt. She was the daughter of Judge and Mrs. John Thornton, the wife of Captain Moss, captain of a company of volunteers who marched to Mexico and a leading Clay County citizen, and sister-in-law of Col. Alexander Doniphan.

I do not know just how she gathered these children. It was not on the church bus! Perhaps they walked or had a horse-drawn buggy to carry them up the hill to the church on Water Street. Caroline and her mother carried out this ministry until interrupted by political events in the 1860's. The Mosses, along with
other Union-sympathizing families fled to St. Louis because of bushwhacker activity in the area.

After the Civil War and returning to Liberty, Caroline began work to support foreign missions. In December of 1867, she accepted an invitation from James B. Taylor of the Foreign Mission Board in Richmond, Virginia, to act as an agent for the Board by promoting its work within the church and collecting funds for foreign missions. Three months later she sent a check for $10.00 to Richmond.

The following year the first documented Female Missionary Society in Missouri was formed at Second Baptist Church with Caroline Moss as president, Or "directress." She was also elected the first president of the Missouri Baptist Women's Missionary Society in 1876.

In 1881 Mrs. Moss sent a report of the missionary society to the associational meeting. Being a woman, she could not address the gathering personally.

Caroline Moss is the first of many people to whom you will be introduced this year--people who have given themselves to Christ and found avenues to serve Him through Second Baptist Church.

by Eleanor Speaker

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